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How Do You Know You Know What You Know?

P6141528By chance….Have you noticed that right now, intelligent people are polarized on issues? They’re holding polar opposite viewpoints? We all do. We think we’ve carefully vetted our positions and are in the right. So how much should we trust our own wisely-thought-through views?

Not much, actually, if one considers the research on how we form our viewpoints. A recent slew of books asks us to ponder this and perhaps change how we interact with those who hold opposing views.

Jonathan Haidt, in The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion, guides us through the neuroscience and psychology research on how we form our opinions. And it’s humbling. Or should be. Not only do we consistently pay attention to information that reinforces what we believe, but the more intelligent we are, the better we are at spinning one-sided arguments.

In Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error, Katheryn Schulz uses both research and humor to help us understand just how wrong we can have the facts and thus how flimsy our arguments can be.

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The Truth About Math Curriculum

question markA few years ago, two of the school districts I work with adopted new mathematics curricula–they each chose the one the other was abandoning. Golly, they could have saved a lot of money by simply boxing up all the teacher and student editions and swapping!

When student performance falls short of expectations, most educators seem to go hunting for new tools such as the ideal curriculum, the ideal personalized intervention program, the ideal iPad app, and so on.

But take a look at my post from last week, The Right Kind of Lazy for Math. What depth of math knowledge do teachers need to guide students in the deep number sense required for this kind of mathematical agility? 

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Are Either/Ors Slowing You Down?

“Beware the Either/Ors” is as important a consideration for school reform as “What will best help students learn?”

Last week, Annie Murphy Paul’s blog Why Kids Should Learn Cursive (and Math Facts, and Word Roots) got a lot of attention. She cites some excellent reasons and points to

…a raft of recent studies supporting the effectiveness of “old school” methods like memorizing math facts, reading aloud, practicing handwriting, and teaching argumentation (activities that once went by the names drill, recitation, penmanship and rhetoric). While the education world is all abuzz about so-called “21st-century skills” like collaboration, problem solving, and critical thinking, this research suggests that we might do well to add a strong dose of the 19th-century to our children’s schooling.

Note she says Add these old methods rather than use Only the old methods.

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What’s Your Professional Learning Community Style?

 

Contrasting Styles Add Spark!

What do you want out of collaborative time? Has your team ever discussed the best way to use that time? One method for understanding each other’s wants and needs is to explore four overall styles that describe different ways that teachers

  • Learn
  • Communicate
  • Value forms of data
  • Benefit from support

While all of us can flex, and benefit from learning in different ways, collaboration is more effective for everyone if no one is constantly left out. 

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Does Your Professional Learning Community Have a Coaching Culture?

If your PLC is endeavoring to go beyond data analysis to deep collaboration that has an impact on student learning, establishing a coaching culture creates the necessary trust. What is a coaching culture? Here are some key markers, available as a handout at the Solution Tree site for my book Creating a Coaching Culture for Professional Learning Communities. Which apply to your team?

  • Members welcome diversity as a tool for making better decisions and use a common framework to communicate more clearly and understand other viewpoints
  • Members can ask questions, share beliefs, challenge ideas, and disagree with each other as part of their mutual commitment to adult learning and improved student achievement;
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Genuine Professional Collaboration

Recently I overheard a conversation between two eye doctors. One was treating a patient who had had a glue gun malfunction, spraying glue all over his eyes. “Yesterday, cleansing away the glue went far better than expected,” the doctor reported. “but I had him come in again today. Now the cornea is clouding and…” He went on to describe his concerns and a possible treatment. My own doctor listened carefully, asked some questions, and called another doctor into the conversation. Together they raised pros and cons of various options and helped the attending physician decide what to do.

All too often, I find that teachers shy away from such collaboration. Maybe they’re afraid that they’ll be judged if anyone finds out that they are struggling with a student or a teaching strategy or certain required concept. Maybe veteran teachers are only sharing what is going well in their classrooms. Maybe they’re thinking, “If I were really a master teacher, I could solve this on my own.”

WRONG. My eye doctor and his colleagues have extensive advanced training, around 20 years of experience, and are each experts in certain eye conditions. Yet, they actively consult with one another. Don’t you agree that teaching is every bit as complex as medical practice? !

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