Education Workshops

Differentiated Coaching

Change is hard work, even when we are convinced it’s worth the effort. Teachers are often expected to change without clear explanations or evidence of how the changes will benefit them or their students.  Meaningful change is most likely to occur when coaches take into consideration the differences in teachers’ beliefs, feelings and personalities.

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Differentiation Through Personality Types 

Students’ learning styles are as unique as their personalities. As a result, the most successful teachers are often those who understand how to adjust their educational techniques to honor students of all intelligences and backgrounds. Seminar participants will learn to use personality type to achieve success in today’s differentiated classroom.

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Differentiated School Leadership 

For decades, businesses have used the theory of personality type to coach leaders, improve team performance, and enhance communication. In this workshop, educational leaders will learn to use type tools to build true learning communities in schools.

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Creating a Coaching Culture for Professional Learning Communities 

Professional learning communities (PLC) are meant to be teams that provide professional development to educators so that they can help all students reach mastery. In truth, not all groups of educators become teams where this can happen. Learn how to use one common framework, personality type, as a coaching framework…

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Differentiated Mathematics Instruction Through Personality Type

This two-day workshop will introduce mathematics educators to personality type theory and focus on how to use the framework for differentiating mathematics classroom instruction, interventions for struggling students, and differentiation in the continuous assessment process.

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Leveraging Differences in Education Conversations–NEW

Do you ever struggle to move your school, district, or community away from either/or thinking and toward productive conversation? From the “right” ways to teach reading and math to the fate of recess to measures of teacher effectiveness, we chase one “wisdom” and change practices, only to get less-than-satisfactory results. All too often, each “wisdom” holds a part of the truth that is crucial to effectively managing the issue being disputed, yet lack of willingness—or the ability—to see the dilemma from other points of view serves to stifle meaningful collaboration toward positive action.

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